“No Blacks in the ‘White City’?

Frederick Douglass at the Haitian Pavilion

Sunday, July 15 at HPHS—5529 S. Lake Park

2 PM (Doors Open at 1:30 PM)

REGISTRATION REQUIRED
Presentation Limit 30 (Ticket Required)
Tour—Open, No Ticket Required
Registration Link Below:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/no-blacks-in-the-white-city-frederick-douglass-at-the-haitian-pavilion-the-challenge-to-the-status-tickets-47622752936

Tour Map

ONLY TICKETED, REGISTERED PARTICIPANTS WILL BE
GUARANTEED A SEAT.
SEATS ARE LIMITED – Eventbrite registered ticket holder only
will be guaranteed a seat for the Presentation 2p -3p.

 

All are welcomed for the Tour {ticket is not necessary} – begins at
3:15p meeting near the Columbian Basin | TIP the meet-up spot is
near the entrance of the Museum of Science and Industry main entrance.
look for structure #8

 

 

 

 


Frederick Douglass served as the most prominent Representative of African Americans at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, from which his race had Largely been excluded despite earnest protest and petitions. Haiti, which had won its independence from France almost 90 years earlier after a successful slave revolution, was the only black nation with a pavilion in the Fair’s “White City,” named for the gleaming, white washed buildings. The proud Republic of Haiti appointed Douglass, who had served as a minister of the U.S. government in Haiti, as one of its representatives at the Fair. Join the Hyde Park Historical Society, Friends of the Parks And DuSable Heritage Association, as we commemorate the 125th year of the World’s fair in Chicago’s Jackson Park for a presentation and tour on the Frederick Douglass’ challenge to the Expo—called “The White City”—not representing and including African-Americans.

Speakers:

  • Christopher R. Reed, PhD
    Professor Emeritus of History at Roosevelt University

    A Roosevelt alumnus, and anative Chicagoan who has matched scholarly interest and civic commitment. His research interests include Chicago history, nineteenth and twentieth century Black Chicago history, U.S. Civil War history, and urban politics. His scholarship includes numerous essays and books. He is the nation‘s leading expert and author of six books on the early history of African Americans in Chicago
  • Rebecca S. Graff, PhD
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology Department of Sociology and Anthropology Lake Forest College

    As a historical archaeologist with research interests in the 19th–and 20th–century urban United States, I explore the relationship between temporality and modernity, memory and material culture, tourism, and nostalgic consumption through archaeological and archival research
  • Courtney S. Pierre–Cane, PhD
    Assistant Professor of History and African American Specializing in US History, African American History. African Diaspora, Haiti and The Diaspora, Women and Gender Studies.

Program:

Open at 1:30p

2pm Welcome (HPHS) Mr.Safar/Mr.Spicer

45min–Presentation/Panel
Professor Pierre-Cain- Panel Moderator

Each speaker will have 3-5 minutes to give remarks/Presentation

Speakers Suggested Key Focus

It would be helpful to have a bit of general
History about the fair–Professor Graff

Some specific history about Douglass and his
concerns/approach–Professor Reed

The Haitian experience and point of view–
Frederick Douglass and Haitian relationship–
ProfessorPierre-Cain

15min-Q&A

5min-Wrap-up and Tour logistics
J. Irizarry, Exec. Dir. FOTP

Tour Information:

1. Meeting area at Museum of Science & Industry
Bldg. By bus / taxi stand area – ( a 5 min walk
from HPHS). It is also known as the Columbian
Basin – structure #8.

2. Public metered parking available .

3. From meeting area it is .5 mile walk approximately
15 min. Walk. To the site location at 59th street
pier and the Bowling green.